misstuesday:

In the Name of the Nightosphere and the Candy Kingdom, We Will Punish You!

I’m Sailor Marceline: www.facebook.com/amandafinleycrafts

Sailor Bubblegum is Tiffany Diaz Cosplay: www.facebook.com/tiffanydiazcosplay

Photographer: www.facebook.com/bentpic5

Worn to MomoCon 2013

The original idea for this image came from the Sailor Moon references in Adventure Time and the art and character design of Natasha Allegri, who considers Sailor Moon to be a huge influence. From there, we saw the artwork of KnockMeOut, which you can see here: http://knockmeout.deviantart.com/art/Scouts-322189649
That inspired the color choices and general look of the outfit.

I love the idea of strong female characters, and I feel like both Adventure Time and Sailor Moon has that.

allthingslinguistic:

Writing Skills: XKCD is on point about language again.
Here’s a study from this year on kids who use abbreviations while texting, and here’s a summary of previous studies: 

The first study, published in 2008, showed that 11 and 12-year-olds in Britain who used more textisms — whether misspelled words (“ppl,” instead of “people”), grammatically incorrect substitutions (“2” for “to” or “too”), wrong verb forms (“he do” instead of “he does”), or missing punctuation — compared to properly written words tended to have slightly better scores on standardized grammar and writing tests and had better spelling, after controlling for test scores in other subjects and other factors. A 2009 study, conducted by some of the same researchers on 88 kids between 10 and 12 years old, found similar associations between high textism use and slightly better reading ability.

Hovertext from the xkcd comic: I’d like to find a corpus of writing from children in a non-self-selected sample (e.g. handwritten letters to the president from everyone in the same teacher’s 7th grade class every year)—and score the kids today versus the kids 20 years ago on various objective measures of writing quality. I’ve heard the idea that exposure to all this amateur peer practice is hurting us, but I’d bet on the generation that conducts the bulk of their social lives via the written word over the generation that occasionally wrote book reports and letters to grandma once a year, any day.

allthingslinguistic:

Writing Skills: XKCD is on point about language again.

Here’s a study from this year on kids who use abbreviations while texting, and here’s a summary of previous studies: 

The first study, published in 2008, showed that 11 and 12-year-olds in Britain who used more textisms — whether misspelled words (“ppl,” instead of “people”), grammatically incorrect substitutions (“2” for “to” or “too”), wrong verb forms (“he do” instead of “he does”), or missing punctuation — compared to properly written words tended to have slightly better scores on standardized grammar and writing tests and had better spelling, after controlling for test scores in other subjects and other factors. A 2009 study, conducted by some of the same researchers on 88 kids between 10 and 12 years old, found similar associations between high textism use and slightly better reading ability.

Hovertext from the xkcd comic: I’d like to find a corpus of writing from children in a non-self-selected sample (e.g. handwritten letters to the president from everyone in the same teacher’s 7th grade class every year)—and score the kids today versus the kids 20 years ago on various objective measures of writing quality. I’ve heard the idea that exposure to all this amateur peer practice is hurting us, but I’d bet on the generation that conducts the bulk of their social lives via the written word over the generation that occasionally wrote book reports and letters to grandma once a year, any day.

smartgirlsattheparty:

President Barack Obama and the first lady Michelle Obama helped fill backpacks with toys for homeless children at the Inspired Teaching charter school on Thursday. 

A sixth-grader at a Washington DC Charter school elicited laughs from President Barack Obama after she told him she thought the special guest at her school was going to be the singer, Beyonce. 

:)